Plan Overview

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 1 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
1 1.1. Develop zoning and policies that grow the Good Food economy Policymakers • Establish Good Food Zones around historically impacted neighborhoods that prioritize healthy, high-road food businesses, while discouraging nuisance activity.
• Fund healthy food business attraction programs and focus on establishments that offer living wage employment, local hire, workforce development for people with barriers to employment and expand access to culturally relevant healthy food options.
• Establish new zoning and permitting categories for innovative food production activities and enterprises
2 1.2. Support small, local, early-stage Good Food entrepreneurs Policymakers • Legalize sidewalk food vending, establish a Healthy Food Cart program to incentivize healthy sidewalk food vending, assist with public health requirements, and educate about new sidewalk food vending regulations.
• Expand opportunities and remove regulatory barriers for home-based or cottage food entrepreneurs
3 1.2. Support small, local, early-stage Good Food entrepreneurs Funders FOR FUNDERS AND BUSINESS
• Increase flexible, character-based loan / financing opportunities for entrepreneurs bringing Good Food to underserved communities.
4 1.2. Support small, local, early-stage Good Food entrepreneurs Business, Funders FOR FUNDERS AND BUSINESS
• Increase flexible, character-based loan / financing opportunities for entrepreneurs bringing Good Food to underserved communities.
5 1.3. Invest in infrastructure that supports Good Food supply Business, Policymakers "FOR POLICYMAKERS AND BUSINESS
• Build more multi-tenant processing, distribution and kitchen facilities accessible to small, mid-size and start-up farm and food businesses.
• Invest in emerging market opportunities that address gaps in the food supply chain
• Collaborate across local and regional governments to better connect mid-sized farms, processors and manufacturers, to urban and regional market opportunities."
6 1.3. Invest in infrastructure that supports Good Food supply Funders FOR FUNDERS
• Expand research and development funding and partnerships that spur innovation and meet the needs of food businesses in Los Angeles.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 2 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
1 2.1. Strengthen connections between healthcare and food Healthcare Institutions • Adopt strategies for healthy cafeterias, food security screenings and referrals, and partner with community based organizations to expand neighborhood food access.
• Adopt a food as medicine approach within health care that provides more holistic nutrition education for medical professionals and patients.
2 2.1. Strengthen connections between healthcare and food Policymakers • Support insurance and Medical/Medicaid coverage for diabetes prevention programs, including lifestyle modification programs that empower people to adopt healthy diets.
• Support a state or local tax on sugar-sweetened beverages which would generate funds in Los Angeles for public health and community food projects.
3 2.2. Expand impact of Good Food Purchasing policy in LA county Policymakers • Expand Good Food Purchasing Program through the adoption of policy by Los Angeles County, including LA County Health Services, Recreation and Parks, and Senior and Community Services Departments.
• Improve quality and sourcing of meals served to food insecure populations receiving public food assistance, including seniors, youth, hospital patients, and the incarcerated
• Identify and develop supply chain opportunities through GFPP
4 2.3. Create economic incentives for healthy food consumption Funders, Policymakers • Grow Market Match and other voucher programs to increase fresh fruit and vegetable purchases by SNAP participants
5 2.3. Create economic incentives for healthy food consumption Business • Promote flexible pricing strategies in food retail across socioeconomically diverse communities to promote affordability for disadvantaged communities.
6 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Policymakers • Establish a Good Food Retailer recognition program for stores that sell healthier food options, accept nutrition subsidies (Food & Income Assistance (SNAP, WIC, etc.)) and abide by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) food waste standards.
7 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Business • Provide in-store marketing of Good Food options that are multilingual and culturally relevant to make the healthy choice the easy choice.
8 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Funders • Increase involvement of impacted communities in defining food access needs and measures of success to inform evaluation and funding for healthy food projects.
9 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Good Food Movement • Launch a public awareness campaign on healthy food consumption that would educate the public on healthy diets, eating locally and seasonally, and how to cook Good Food.
• Use food as a vehicle for dialogue on critical social issues across diverse communities through cultural and storytelling events.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 3 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
1 3.1. Build food and organic waste recycling infrastructure Business, Policymakers • Invest in constructing local waste management infrastructure including new industrial facilities to compost or repurpose food
• Allow and encourage food businesses to repurpose surplus food and food scraps into “upcycled” products
2 3.1. Build food and organic waste recycling infrastructure Policymakers, Good Food Movement • Expand community compost hubs so that neighborhoods can compost food scraps at community gardens, schools, churches or other neighborhood places.
• Offer food scrap drop off at farmers markets for transfer to compost sites
• Utilize technology such as online databases or phone apps to better coordinate food recovery and track diversion from landfills.
3 3.2. Make food recovery and composting the new normal through policy Policymakers, Business • Implement state and federal food waste mandates through local plans, infrastructure and outcomes
• Offer free kitchen-top food scrap bins for residential waste collection.
• Ensure all food businesses have food recovery options available through their waste hauling service.
• Standardize food donation options for businesses that want to donate food to shelters and food banks within City of Los Angeles RecycLA franchise system, and standardize compensation for food recovery organizations involved.
4 3.2. Make food recovery and composting the new normal through policy Policymakers • Require a “Zero Waste Plan” including food recovery for special events permits in Los Angeles.
5 3.2. Make food recovery and composting the new normal through policy Good Food Movement • Encourage greater consistency in methods and metrics for food waste diversion from landfill among all relevant agencies and organizations.
6 3.3. Establish education and training programs on food waste prevention, recovery and recycling Business • Train restaurants and other food businesses on sustainable food waste reduction practices and safe food donation practices.
7 3.3. Establish education and training programs on food waste prevention, recovery and recycling Policymakers • Encourage schools to reduce food waste through programs like “Shared Table,” “Save It for Later,” food donation or school garden composting, which provide a model for students in surplus food management.
8 3.3. Establish education and training programs on food waste prevention, recovery and recycling Good Food Movement • Promote public recognition programs for organizations and businesses engaging in sustainable food waste management practices.
• Collect better data to demonstrate the impacts of food waste prevention interventions to funders and policymakers
9 3.4. Ensure new food waste employment opportunities in public and private sector are accessible to historically disadvantaged workers Business, Policymakers • Ensure that employment opportunities emerging from new food waste industry provide living wages.
• Uphold fair labor standards and prioritize local hiring of disadvantaged workers and people with barriers to employment, whom often are people of color.
• Prioritize contracts, subcontracts and investment opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses in food waste.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 5 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
7 5.1. Grow Good Food in our neighborhoods Policymakers • Increase access to land for urban agriculture by securing suitable parcels and promoting programs like Urban Agriculture Incentive Zones.
• Mitigate negative impacts of increased water rates on low-income growers by offering rebates on water-saving technology, such as drip irrigation.
• Create joint-use policies at school gardens, libraries, and parks for urban farms, compost hubs and other activities supporting Good Food production.
• Streamline permitting and leases for community gardens and urban farms on both public and private land. Remove barriers to accessing land, for example by expanding the Urban Agriculture Incentive Zone to more cities in LA County.
• Establish clear guidelines and encourage food growing in public housing.
8 5.2. Encourage food sovereignty and local control of food Policymakers • Develop land-use strategies and incentives that support smart growth, preserve farming in the region, and protect urban farming locally.
• Encourage first “right-of-refusal” option for tenant farmers who wish to buy their farm when the land owner decides to sell.
9 5.2. Encourage food sovereignty and local control of food Good Food Movement • Support community ownership of food production resources through land trusts and cooperatives.
• Encourage seed saving and the establishment of seed banks and libraries.
10 5.3. Support regenerative agriculture and acroecology Policymakers • Increase funding for regenerative agricultural research, extension and education and its benefits for climate adaptation.
• Incentivize regenerative agricultural practices, including water conservation, utilizing closed loop nutrient systems, greater reliance on and working in tandem with natural systems and greater biodiversity, through local, state and national policies.
• Invest in healthy soils to sequester carbon and capture water (i.e. “carbon farming”).
11 5.3. Support regenerative agriculture and acroecology Good Food Movement • Promote and expand community education on the benefits of healthy soils and biodiversity and regenerative agriculture.
12 5.4. Advocate for regional natural resources needs in state and federal policy Policymakers • Increase subsidies and financing in Farm Bill for urban, traditional indigenous and regenerative farming practices.
• Support the inclusion of the crop insurance program in the Farm Bill with measures that would facilitate a healthy soil strategy in California.
• Expand Beginning and Socially Disadvantaged Farmers Program in the Farm Bill. Include support for student debt relief and/or grants for beginning farmers or farmers that contribute social benefits.
13 5.5. Increase climate and community resiliency through food system planning Policymakers • Prioritize food security in emergency and climate resiliency plans.
• Convene industry and community partners to facilitate contingency plans to ensure consistent food security for the most vulnerable communities during emergency or major climate events.
• Include sustainable and urban agriculture in the update of California’s Climate Smart Agriculture Programs.
14 5.5. Increase climate and community resiliency through food system planning Business • Develop contingency plans for food retail and distribution to respond to a major climate or emergency event, and collaborate with local government to meet the needs of vulnerable populations.
15 5.5. Increase climate and community resiliency through food system planning Good Food Movement • Create neighborhood food resilience plans that outline strategies for ensuring safe food access at the community level.
• Encourage climate adaptation in urban food growing practices through integration of new water-conservation technology, seed saving and community skill building.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

Plan Information

TermDatabase entry
Plan RegionCalifornia state
Publication Date2005
Entry reviewed by original authorYes
PDF attachmentView the Full Report
Plan TitleThe New Mainstream: A Sustainable Food Agenda for California for Review by the Roots of Change Council and the Roots of Change Fund
WebpageRoots of Change Website
Author(s)Ecotrust (Food and Farms Program); Roots of Change
Author Type Non-profit; Food Policy Council
Region Type State
Funding Sources Foundations; Individual Donors
FundersRoots of Change (ROC) Fund. ROC is funded by: Arkay Foundation, Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation, Columbia Foundation, Fred Gellert Family Foundations, Gala Fund, Marisla Foundation, Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund, William Zimmerman Foundation, and W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
Total Project BudgetFundingUnspecified
Plan GoalsTo create a more sustainable CA food system via social, economic, and environmental levers. Includes 22 more specific goals to achieve these objectives.
Intended AudienceRoots of Change Council; Roots of Change Fund
Plan Recommendation StructureThe plan outlines recommendations under 4 key sections, each with detailed recommendations for Roots of Change to reach the overarching goals of a sustainable CA food system.
Plan Sections:1.  A theory of change drawing on Kim and Anderson’s taxonomy of systems diagrams and archetypes. The “Limits to Growth” archetype was used to examine mechanisms that would limit the expansion of convention and niche-sustainable food systems. The “Shifting the Burden” archetype revealed the need for strategies that reinforce sustainability values while reducing barriers to fundamental change towards sustainability, such as building “broad alliances based on opportunity-criteria.” (p. 6)
 2. A 2030 vision for CA food system, including a food systems actors analysis, 11 values for a new food system, and 22 goals to reach this vision; 
3. An agenda for change. This section includes the most impactful recommendations to achieve the identified goals. Recommendations are broken into three initiatives (1. “The Best and Brightest: respected, competent, mission-driven leadership and workforce; 2. Get Fresh: healthy, community-based food systems; 3. A New Urban-Rural Partnership: Linking communities, economics and the environment” (p. 25)), with strategies to achieve these, as well as indicators of success (e.g. recommendations to measure the progress of reaching their goals);
4. Finally, a compiled recommendation list for the audience, Roots of Change Council. This list distills the above sections and includes recommendations for how ROC Council should move forward with this project, such as the adoption of the suggested theory of change, and suggestions for stakeholder engagement, among others (see p. 67).
Catalyst for PlanThis project began in 1999, spurred in part by conversations between public and private grantmakers who wanted to see major shifts towards a more sustainable CA food system. Susan Clark (with Columbia Foundation at the time) and Bruce Hirsch from Heller Foundation were major proponents of the project and co-chaired the effort.
Creation Process1. Interviewed 65 food systems leaders to determine components and underlying values of the food system and goals for the food system.
2. Based on the interviews, constructed a “food systems wheel” outlining key components of the food system.
3. Based on the interviews, evaluated current theories of change for the food systems.
4. Developed a new theory of change, diagrammed using systems thinking tools.
5. Developed an evaluation system of sustainable food system values.
6. Based on the interviews and a lit review, identified differences between sustainable “value chains” and conventional “supply chains.”
7. Based on the interviews, defined 22 goals for the CA food system; refined goals with ROC council.
8. Identified and tested the sustainable food systems mission with individuals and groups.
9. Developed a scenario-building tool to model statewide smart growth strategies for California, emphasizing preserving farmland, and compared to “business as usual” projections.
10. Developed a dataset for agro-ecological zones in CA where practices can be applied.
11. Developed a toolset for distributing projected population demographics with or without smart growth accommodations.
12. Developed a toolset for projecting where different types of food outlets may exist in future scenarios.
13. Developed a toolset to project the number of schools and restaurants needed to serve the future population.
14. Developed a toolset to evaluate how different value chains may interact in the future.
15. Interviewed 27 producers to fill data gaps on how sustainable food systems operate.
16. Identified 700 datasets to be used for modeling.
17. Produced 22 reports (e.g. “Knowledge Products”), some with contracted organizations (e.g., NRDC), on issues and trends in sustainable food systems transitions.
18. Conducted second-round interviews with 84 food system leaders to identify additional transition strategies for sustainable food systems.
19. Compiled qualitative and quantitative information into “Bold Agenda for Change,” developed based on the project’s theory of change.
20. Identified 77 indicators of success for a sustainable food system, based on ideas from stakeholders and data managers. Winnowed this list of indicators down to primary indicators, supplemental indicators, cross-cutting indicators, and ideal or “wish list” indicators.
Theoretical Frameworks EmployedSystems Thinking
Theoretical Framework(s): Additional LiteratureDaniel Kim and Virginia Anderson’s body of work on systems diagrams and archetypes. Systems Archetype Basics: From Story to Structure is their foundational text outlining these concepts. 
Development TimelineApprox. 1.5 years
Implementation StrategyThe final section of this plan compiles recommendations for the project team, Roots of Change Council, to adopt in order to achieve community-based implementation of their “Agenda for Change.” These include long-term objectives coupled with short-term strategies (see p. 67).
Implementation Timeline25 years (by 2030)
Evaluation StrategyThis plan outlines evaluation strategies, or “indicators” for 18 or the 22 goals. The project developed a set of 11 criteria by which to assess the appropriateness of indicators, and each indicator must satisfy a set of 10 principles to be considered appropriate (pg. 58). The indicators suggest the measurement of change within each sector. For example, measurement of “Daily per capita servings of fruit and vegetables” (p. 59).
International Development Framework(s)None
Current Plan StatusInactive
Government Adoption StatusNot Adopted
Government Adoption Status (Notes)Adopted by Roots of Change Council, which implemented many of the plan’s recommendations, emphasizing increasing coordination and collaboration among like-minded organizations. This seems to have sparked other initiatives, one of which was an Ag Vision that was adopted by the California Department of Food & Agriculture (CDFA). According to ROC, subsequent CDFA strategic plans have also drawn from this plan.
Supplemental DocumentsView Supplemental Documents:
Ecotrust (2012). Resilience & Transformation: A Regional Approach
Silverman & Hill (2018). The dynamics of purposeful change: a model.
Silverman, Brady & Meter. (2005). Sustainable Food Systems: Working Towards a Fundamental Solution.