Plan Overview

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 1 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
1 1.1. Develop zoning and policies that grow the Good Food economy Policymakers • Establish Good Food Zones around historically impacted neighborhoods that prioritize healthy, high-road food businesses, while discouraging nuisance activity.
• Fund healthy food business attraction programs and focus on establishments that offer living wage employment, local hire, workforce development for people with barriers to employment and expand access to culturally relevant healthy food options.
• Establish new zoning and permitting categories for innovative food production activities and enterprises
2 1.2. Support small, local, early-stage Good Food entrepreneurs Policymakers • Legalize sidewalk food vending, establish a Healthy Food Cart program to incentivize healthy sidewalk food vending, assist with public health requirements, and educate about new sidewalk food vending regulations.
• Expand opportunities and remove regulatory barriers for home-based or cottage food entrepreneurs
3 1.2. Support small, local, early-stage Good Food entrepreneurs Funders FOR FUNDERS AND BUSINESS
• Increase flexible, character-based loan / financing opportunities for entrepreneurs bringing Good Food to underserved communities.
4 1.2. Support small, local, early-stage Good Food entrepreneurs Business, Funders FOR FUNDERS AND BUSINESS
• Increase flexible, character-based loan / financing opportunities for entrepreneurs bringing Good Food to underserved communities.
5 1.3. Invest in infrastructure that supports Good Food supply Business, Policymakers "FOR POLICYMAKERS AND BUSINESS
• Build more multi-tenant processing, distribution and kitchen facilities accessible to small, mid-size and start-up farm and food businesses.
• Invest in emerging market opportunities that address gaps in the food supply chain
• Collaborate across local and regional governments to better connect mid-sized farms, processors and manufacturers, to urban and regional market opportunities."
6 1.3. Invest in infrastructure that supports Good Food supply Funders FOR FUNDERS
• Expand research and development funding and partnerships that spur innovation and meet the needs of food businesses in Los Angeles.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 2 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
1 2.1. Strengthen connections between healthcare and food Healthcare Institutions • Adopt strategies for healthy cafeterias, food security screenings and referrals, and partner with community based organizations to expand neighborhood food access.
• Adopt a food as medicine approach within health care that provides more holistic nutrition education for medical professionals and patients.
2 2.1. Strengthen connections between healthcare and food Policymakers • Support insurance and Medical/Medicaid coverage for diabetes prevention programs, including lifestyle modification programs that empower people to adopt healthy diets.
• Support a state or local tax on sugar-sweetened beverages which would generate funds in Los Angeles for public health and community food projects.
3 2.2. Expand impact of Good Food Purchasing policy in LA county Policymakers • Expand Good Food Purchasing Program through the adoption of policy by Los Angeles County, including LA County Health Services, Recreation and Parks, and Senior and Community Services Departments.
• Improve quality and sourcing of meals served to food insecure populations receiving public food assistance, including seniors, youth, hospital patients, and the incarcerated
• Identify and develop supply chain opportunities through GFPP
4 2.3. Create economic incentives for healthy food consumption Funders, Policymakers • Grow Market Match and other voucher programs to increase fresh fruit and vegetable purchases by SNAP participants
5 2.3. Create economic incentives for healthy food consumption Business • Promote flexible pricing strategies in food retail across socioeconomically diverse communities to promote affordability for disadvantaged communities.
6 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Policymakers • Establish a Good Food Retailer recognition program for stores that sell healthier food options, accept nutrition subsidies (Food & Income Assistance (SNAP, WIC, etc.)) and abide by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) food waste standards.
7 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Business • Provide in-store marketing of Good Food options that are multilingual and culturally relevant to make the healthy choice the easy choice.
8 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Funders • Increase involvement of impacted communities in defining food access needs and measures of success to inform evaluation and funding for healthy food projects.
9 2.4. Promote Good Food at retail and community institutions Good Food Movement • Launch a public awareness campaign on healthy food consumption that would educate the public on healthy diets, eating locally and seasonally, and how to cook Good Food.
• Use food as a vehicle for dialogue on critical social issues across diverse communities through cultural and storytelling events.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 3 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
1 3.1. Build food and organic waste recycling infrastructure Business, Policymakers • Invest in constructing local waste management infrastructure including new industrial facilities to compost or repurpose food
• Allow and encourage food businesses to repurpose surplus food and food scraps into “upcycled” products
2 3.1. Build food and organic waste recycling infrastructure Policymakers, Good Food Movement • Expand community compost hubs so that neighborhoods can compost food scraps at community gardens, schools, churches or other neighborhood places.
• Offer food scrap drop off at farmers markets for transfer to compost sites
• Utilize technology such as online databases or phone apps to better coordinate food recovery and track diversion from landfills.
3 3.2. Make food recovery and composting the new normal through policy Policymakers, Business • Implement state and federal food waste mandates through local plans, infrastructure and outcomes
• Offer free kitchen-top food scrap bins for residential waste collection.
• Ensure all food businesses have food recovery options available through their waste hauling service.
• Standardize food donation options for businesses that want to donate food to shelters and food banks within City of Los Angeles RecycLA franchise system, and standardize compensation for food recovery organizations involved.
4 3.2. Make food recovery and composting the new normal through policy Policymakers • Require a “Zero Waste Plan” including food recovery for special events permits in Los Angeles.
5 3.2. Make food recovery and composting the new normal through policy Good Food Movement • Encourage greater consistency in methods and metrics for food waste diversion from landfill among all relevant agencies and organizations.
6 3.3. Establish education and training programs on food waste prevention, recovery and recycling Business • Train restaurants and other food businesses on sustainable food waste reduction practices and safe food donation practices.
7 3.3. Establish education and training programs on food waste prevention, recovery and recycling Policymakers • Encourage schools to reduce food waste through programs like “Shared Table,” “Save It for Later,” food donation or school garden composting, which provide a model for students in surplus food management.
8 3.3. Establish education and training programs on food waste prevention, recovery and recycling Good Food Movement • Promote public recognition programs for organizations and businesses engaging in sustainable food waste management practices.
• Collect better data to demonstrate the impacts of food waste prevention interventions to funders and policymakers
9 3.4. Ensure new food waste employment opportunities in public and private sector are accessible to historically disadvantaged workers Business, Policymakers • Ensure that employment opportunities emerging from new food waste industry provide living wages.
• Uphold fair labor standards and prioritize local hiring of disadvantaged workers and people with barriers to employment, whom often are people of color.
• Prioritize contracts, subcontracts and investment opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses in food waste.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

LA PLAN (2017) Goal 5 Strategies and Tactics

wdt_ID STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION
7 5.1. Grow Good Food in our neighborhoods Policymakers • Increase access to land for urban agriculture by securing suitable parcels and promoting programs like Urban Agriculture Incentive Zones.
• Mitigate negative impacts of increased water rates on low-income growers by offering rebates on water-saving technology, such as drip irrigation.
• Create joint-use policies at school gardens, libraries, and parks for urban farms, compost hubs and other activities supporting Good Food production.
• Streamline permitting and leases for community gardens and urban farms on both public and private land. Remove barriers to accessing land, for example by expanding the Urban Agriculture Incentive Zone to more cities in LA County.
• Establish clear guidelines and encourage food growing in public housing.
8 5.2. Encourage food sovereignty and local control of food Policymakers • Develop land-use strategies and incentives that support smart growth, preserve farming in the region, and protect urban farming locally.
• Encourage first “right-of-refusal” option for tenant farmers who wish to buy their farm when the land owner decides to sell.
9 5.2. Encourage food sovereignty and local control of food Good Food Movement • Support community ownership of food production resources through land trusts and cooperatives.
• Encourage seed saving and the establishment of seed banks and libraries.
10 5.3. Support regenerative agriculture and acroecology Policymakers • Increase funding for regenerative agricultural research, extension and education and its benefits for climate adaptation.
• Incentivize regenerative agricultural practices, including water conservation, utilizing closed loop nutrient systems, greater reliance on and working in tandem with natural systems and greater biodiversity, through local, state and national policies.
• Invest in healthy soils to sequester carbon and capture water (i.e. “carbon farming”).
11 5.3. Support regenerative agriculture and acroecology Good Food Movement • Promote and expand community education on the benefits of healthy soils and biodiversity and regenerative agriculture.
12 5.4. Advocate for regional natural resources needs in state and federal policy Policymakers • Increase subsidies and financing in Farm Bill for urban, traditional indigenous and regenerative farming practices.
• Support the inclusion of the crop insurance program in the Farm Bill with measures that would facilitate a healthy soil strategy in California.
• Expand Beginning and Socially Disadvantaged Farmers Program in the Farm Bill. Include support for student debt relief and/or grants for beginning farmers or farmers that contribute social benefits.
13 5.5. Increase climate and community resiliency through food system planning Policymakers • Prioritize food security in emergency and climate resiliency plans.
• Convene industry and community partners to facilitate contingency plans to ensure consistent food security for the most vulnerable communities during emergency or major climate events.
• Include sustainable and urban agriculture in the update of California’s Climate Smart Agriculture Programs.
14 5.5. Increase climate and community resiliency through food system planning Business • Develop contingency plans for food retail and distribution to respond to a major climate or emergency event, and collaborate with local government to meet the needs of vulnerable populations.
15 5.5. Increase climate and community resiliency through food system planning Good Food Movement • Create neighborhood food resilience plans that outline strategies for ensuring safe food access at the community level.
• Encourage climate adaptation in urban food growing practices through integration of new water-conservation technology, seed saving and community skill building.
STRATEGY NO. & DESCRIPTION PLAN TAGS AUDIENCE TACTIC TAGS TACTIC DESCRIPTION

Plan Information

TermDefinition of TermDatabase entry
Plan RegionRegional scope of planLos Angeles (2017)
Publication DateYear that plan was originally published2017
Plan TitleFormal title of the published plan/documentGood Food For All Agenda
WebpageIf applicable, webpage associated with the plan/planning projecthttps://www.goodfoodla.org/good-food-for-all-agenda
AuthorsListed author(s) of the plan, and descriptions as applicableLos Angeles Food Policy Council
Author Type Category types: [Partnership; University; Government; Non-profit; Network; Food Policy Council]Network; Food Policy Council
Region Type [Inter-state; State; City: County]City
Funding Sources for Plan Development [Foundations, State Government; Municipal Government; Federal Government; Individual Donors; State University; Private University; Non-profit organizations/entities; Unspecified]Municipal Government and foundations  
Fundersfor Plan Development Compiled list of fundersUnspecified; however, the 2010 plan and foundational plan to this plan was funded by the City of Los Angeles, through the Fresh Food Access Program funded by the Los Angeles Conservation Corps and the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute
Total Funding for Plan Total amount of fundingUnspecified
Plan GoalsOverarching goals of the plan/recommendationsThis was an update of the 2010 plan of the LA Food Policy Council, and continues that plan’s central goal is to create a Good Food System. A Good Food System outlines five central metrics, each with an emphasis on equity:
1. “Prioritizes the health and wellbeing of our residents;2. Makes healthy, high quality food affordable;3. Contributes to a thriving economy where all participants in the -food supply chain receive fair compensation and fair treatment;4. Protects and strengthens our biodiversity and regenerates natural resources;5. Ensures that Good Food is accessible to all” (p. 7).
Intended AudienceWho is this plan written for?Policy, business, education programs, and “for all of us” (p. 5). Specific audience is outlined as follows: Elected officials, foundations and other funders, community-based organizations, healthcare institutions, farms and food businesses, food-based coalitions, public health, planning, and community development, CalFresh and WIC enrollment offices, climate and emergency preparedness organizations, and regional agencies. 
Plan Recommendation StructureOverview of how recommendations are structured within the written document,, i.e.: “5 goals, each with strategies and sub-recommendations”, etc.This plan is built on the 2010 Good Food For All Agenda, and continues to holds six “Priority Action Areas”.  wWitht this version there are  sub-sections that include specific strategies for different categories of organization: policymakers, businesses, funders, and “the Good Food Movement” (p. 13):
1. Promote a Good Food economy for all2. Create a cultural shift for Good Food3. Eliminate food waste and reclaim the resource4. Eliminate hunger5. Strengthen environmental resiliency and regeneration6. Deepen impact of the Good Food movement
Catalyst for PlanAny important events that led to the creation of the plan, its funding, etc.An update to the Good Food for All Agenda (2010), and with the experience of 7 years of that plan, to include in the update  as a way to guide priorities for decision-makers, funders and leaders between 2017 and 2023.
Creation ProcessThe process by which this document was created, including Stakeholder Engagement Strategy.This plan builds off of the research and development of the Good Food for All Agenda which was published in 2010 (attached; also included as a separate entry in this database).
Following the 2010 publication, the Los Angeles Food Policy Council (LAFPC) was created. Because the 2010 plan was written as a living document, this 2017 update gathered input from over 300 stakeholders to iterate on the initial document.
The LAFPC facilitated 13 focus groups, listening sessions, network events and discussions, 11 interviews with experts, stakeholders, and decision-makers, and 7 additional reviews and revisions by food systems leaders.
Theoretical Framework  [Collective Impact Framework; Transformative Scenario Planning; Human Centered Design; Design Thinking; Systems Thinking; Other; N/A]N/A
Theoretical Framework: LiteratureIf included, what literature did the report use as a theoretical framework?Unspecified
Development TimelineLength of time it took for the plan to be created and published.1 year
Implementation StrategyArticulated strategies used to implement the recommendations.Under each priority action, this plan outlines sub-sections to reach the overarching goal. Within these sections, the document outlines broad recommendations for applicable audiences, such as policymakers, funders, businesses, healthcare institutions, and the Good Food movement leaders. 
Recommendations include, but are not limited to, specific policy changes, initiatives, equity decision frameworks, suggestions for partnerships, and communication strategies.
Moving forward, the LAFPC broadly outlines a commitment to continue working with LAFPC Working Groups, network and local policymakers, and on local, state, and federal programs to reach their goals.
Implementation TimelineRecommended length of time for Plan to be implemented by.6 years (2017-2023)
Evaluation StrategyEstablished strategy for monitoring and evaluating plan implementation post-publication.Unspecified
Supplemental Documents (to be attached within the AirTable)Supplemental documents that were published by the FSP group or corresponding organizations, and/or any document that provided background information and research to inform the analyzed plan.LA 2010 plan