Process Analysis

In order to analyze the process of plan/charter creation, we drew summary data from the catalog of plans and charters, including information on average funding amount, funding sources, etc. A full list of included information is below. Using these entries,  statistics were drawn across all 25 analyzed plans and charters.

  • Publication Date
  • Plan Title
  • Author(s)
  • Author Type
  • Region Type
  • Funding Sources
  • Funders
  • Total Project Budget
  • Plan Goals
  • Intended Audience
  • Plan Recommendation Structure
  • Catalyst for Plan Creation
  • Creation Process
  • Theoretical Framework(s) Employed
  • Theoretical Framework(s): Additional Literature
  • Development Timeline
  • Implementation Strategy
  • Implementation Timeline
  • Evaluation Strategy
  • International Development Framework(s)
  • Current Plan StatusGovernment Adoption Status
  • Government Adoption Status: Notes
  • Supplemental Documents

Codes marked with an asterisk (*) are Key Planning Elements (16 total):

  • *Agriculture & Food Production
  • *Climate Mitigation
  • *Culture Shift (Good Food Movement)
  • *Equity & Justice
  • *Food Safety
  • *Food Security
  • *Food Sovereignty
  • *Food Waste
  • *Good Food Governance
  • *Good/Local Food Economies
  • *Labor/Food Workers
  • *Land & Resource Use
  • *Land Access
  • *Nutrition & Health
  • *Supply Chain Infrastructure
  • *Workforce Development   
  • Advocacy
  • Alternative Food Distribution Tactics
  • Business Regulations
  • Commercial Food Waste
  • Community Food Growing
  • Community Outreach
  • Conservation & Land Management
  • Emergency Response
  • Emergency Response
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Farm & Producer Business Support
  • Farmers Markets
  • Farmland Zoning & Regulations
  • Financing/Affordability, Land
  • Food & Income Assistance (SNAP, WIC, etc.)
  • Food & Nutrition Literacy
  • Food Access (consumer)
  • Food Aggregation & Food Hubs
  • Food as Medicine
  • Food Availability (retailers)
  • Food in Public Institutions
  • Food in Schools
  • Food Labeling & Marketing
  • Food Processing
  • Food Storage
  • Food System Coordination
  • Food System Plan implementation
  • Food Transport
  • Food Worker Wages
  • Funding & Investment Strategies
  • Household Food Waste
  • Housing Access
  • Immigration
  • Indigenous Foodways
  • Leadership/Staffing
  • Legislation
  • Livestock & Dairy
  • Local Brand Promotion
  • Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning
  • Networks/Bodies/Council (FPCs)
  • Nutrition Regulations
  • Oceans and Waterways
  • Preserving Farmland
  • Producer Market Access
  • Public Messaging & Marketing
  • Public Private Partnerships
  • Public Procurement
  • Public Transportation & Infrastructure
  • Purchasing Power (consumers)
  • Regional Coordination
  • Research & Innovation 
  • Retail Zoning
  • Retailer Market Access
  • School Curricula
  • Seafood & Fisheries
  • Small Business Support
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Training & Education, Agriculture
  • Training & Education, General
  • University Programs
  • Urban Garden Zoning & Regulations
  • Wage Policy, General
  • Water Use
  • Worker Safety
  • Young, Beginning, and Small (YBS) Farmers

Four feedback sessions with planners and academics were held to review the content and methodology of this work. Additionally, we are in the process of beta-testing the functionality of the online toolkit

This database provides a platform to analyze the recommendations and planning processes of 25 states and municipalities. However, future research and work to update and add existing and developing plans and charters will be of critical importance to this toolkit’s ongoing functionality. Additionally, our small sample size for city/county-level plans and charters limited the ability to draw conclusive summary information at the non-state level. Follow up research would be to include additional municipality plans and charters to this database. 

Lastly, this toolkit does not provide metrics for plan success, nor does it focus on “best practices.” A qualitative and quantitative assessment of food systems plans and charters would benefit the larger community of practice in exploring those questions. Future qualitative analysis would additionally benefit from the inclusion of community members and those most impacted by food systems transformation outside of the formal sphere of planning.