Analysis: How are plans and charters developed?

Food System Plan & Charter Database

We reviewed the plans and charters of 20 state & inter-state region 4 cities and counties. For each, we examined the strategies that were used to create the document.

  • Leadership/Staffing
  • Legislation
  • Livestock & Dairy
  • Local Brand Promotion
  • Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning
  • Networks/Bodies/Council (FPCs)
  • Nutrition Regulations
  • Oceans and Waterways
  • Preserving Farmland
  • Producer Market Access
  • Public Messaging & Marketing
  • Public Private Partnerships
  • Public Procurement
  • Public Transportation & Infrastructure
  • Purchasing Power (consumers)
  • Regional Coordination
  • Research & Innovation
  • Research & Innovation 
  • Retail Zoning
  • Retailer Market Access
  • School Curricula
  • Seafood & Fisheries
  • Small Business Support
  • Sustainable Agriculture
  • Training & Education, Agriculture
  • Training & Education, General
  • University Programs
  • Urban Garden Zoning & Regulations
  • Wage Policy, General
  • Water Use
  • Worker Safety
  • Young, Beginning, and Small (YBS) Farmers

Key Characteristics of Food system Plans and Charters

The following summary statistics draw from the Catalog of Plans and Charters in order to offer insights into trends across state-level planning processes. This research does not offer best practices within food systems planning; the below statistics aim to help offer a window into how other planning processes have been conducted.

Note: The following statistics apply only to state-level plans and charters

  • Average total funding: $279,507
  • 47% of plans/charters published after 2011 employed the Collective Impact Framework
  • Average development timeline: 2.2 years
  • 40% of plans establish specific implementation timelines, but 55% articulate plan implementation strategies.
  • 0% of plans make reference to the UN Sustainable Development Goals